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Editorial Results (free)

1. Batter up! Things to know about NCAA super regionals -

Super regionals are the next stop on the NCAA baseball tournament's Road to Omaha.

Four of the best-of-three series are Friday through Sunday: Notre Dame (38-14) at No. 1 national seed Tennessee (56-7), No. 9 Texas (45-19) at No. 8 East Carolina (45-19), No. 12 Louisville (42-19-1) at No. 5 Texas A&M (40-18), Oklahoma (40-21) at No. 4 Virginia Tech (44-12).

2. Goodbye NYC: Estimates show big city losses, Sunbelt gains -

Ko Im always thought she would live in New York forever. She knew every corner of Manhattan and had worked hard to build a community of friends. Living in a small apartment, she found her attitude shifting early in the pandemic. After her brother accepted a job in Seattle in the summer of 2020, she decided to move there too.

3. Love 'em or hate 'em, record-setting Vols just keep winning -

The beat goes on for Tennessee. The top-ranked Volunteers (31-1) became the first Southeastern Conference team to open 12-0 in league play after they took three games from Missouri in Knoxville over the weekend.

4. Ex-police officer faces jury trial on Capitol riot charges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Over a year ago, two off-duty police officers from a small town in Virginia were charged with storming the U.S. Capitol together. One of them is heading to trial and faced a courtroom full of potential jurors on Monday. The other could be a key prosecution witness.

5. How China's TikTok, Facebook influencers push propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To her 1.4 million followers across TikTok, YouTube, Instagram and Facebook, Vica Li says she is a "life blogger" and "food lover" who wants to teach her fans about China so they can travel the country with ease.

6. Bass, Berry & Sims boosts data privacy roster -

Bass, Berry & Sims has added Roy Wyman as a member and Colton Driver and Wesley McCulloch as associates in the Nashville office. Each attorney focuses his practice on complex data privacy and cybersecurity matters, bolstering the firm’s privacy and data security offerings within its Intellectual Property and Technology Practice Group.

7. Buttigieg doles out $241M to US ports to boost supply chain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg is awarding more than $241 million in grants to bolster U.S ports, part of the Biden administration's near-term plan to address America's clogged supply chain with infrastructure improvements to speed the flow of goods.

8. To grandmother's house or no? Omicron disrupts holiday plans -

Dave Fravel and his wife invited several relatives to their Cape Cod home for Christmas to share food, gifts and the togetherness they've longed for during the lonely days of the pandemic. They were also looking forward to a holiday sightseeing trip to New York City.

9. AP-NORC poll: Democrats optimistic but divided on compromise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Six months into Democrats' unified control of Washington, most Democrats are on board with President Joe Biden and where he's trying to take the country — even if they're divided on how to get there.

10. Senate GOP rejects Biden infrastructure plan, prep new offer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans on Friday panned President Joe Biden's latest infrastructure proposal  and are expected to make a new offer as talks grind toward next week's deadline for progress on a bipartisan deal.

11. Travel numbers climb as Americans hit the road for holiday -

Americans hit the road in near-record numbers at the start of the Memorial Day weekend, as their eagerness to break free from coronavirus confinement overcame higher prices for flights, gasoline and hotels.

12. Mass shooters exploited gun laws, loopholes before carnage -

The suspect in the shooting at a Boulder, Colorado, supermarket was convicted of assaulting a high school classmate but still got a gun. The man accused of opening fire on three massage businesses in the Atlanta area bought his gun just hours before the attack — no waiting required.

13. Trump bids farewell to Washington, hints of comeback -

WASHINGTON (AP) — His term at an end, President Donald Trump said farewell to Washington on Wednesday but also hinted about a comeback despite a legacy of chaos, tumult and bitter divisions in the country he led for four years.

14. Capitol rioters included highly trained ex-military, cops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump's supporters massed outside the Capitol last week and sang the national anthem, a line of men wearing olive-drab helmets and body armor trudged purposefully up the marble stairs in a single-file line, each man holding the jacket collar of the one ahead.

15. Who were they? Records reveal Trump fans who stormed Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They came from across America, summoned by President Donald Trump to march on Washington in support of his false claim that the November election was stolen and to stop the congressional certification of Democrat Joe Biden as the victor.

16. Race to vaccinate millions in US off to slow, messy start -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Terry Beth Hadler was so eager to get a lifesaving COVID-19 vaccination that the 69-year-old piano teacher stood in line overnight in a parking lot with hundreds of other senior citizens.

17. Retailers brace for flood of returns from online shopping -

NEW YORK (AP) — A huge surge in online shopping during the pandemic has been a savior for retailers, but it comes at a price.

Shoppers are expected to return twice as many items as they did during last year's holiday period, costing companies roughly $1.1 billion, according to Narvar Inc., a software and technology company that manages online returns for hundreds of brands.

18. A look at the 29 people Trump pardoned or gave commutations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law's father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

19. A season of fear, not cheer, as virus changes Christmas -

Montserrat Parello lost her husband eight years ago, and Christmas gatherings with children and grandchildren had helped her deal with her loneliness. But this year, the 83-year-old will be alone for the holiday at her home in Barcelona, due to the risk of infection from the coronavirus.

20. Winter travel raises more fears of viral spread -

Tens of millions of people are expected to travel to family gatherings or winter vacations over Christmas, despite pleas by public health experts who fear the result could be another surge in COVID-19 cases.

21. Americans pivot from red-hot Trump to Biden's seasoned cool -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a crystallizing moment at the last presidential debate, Donald Trump and Joe Biden fielded a question about people of color who live alongside chemical plants and oil refineries that seem to be making them sick.

22. Trump, Biden hand their fate to voters, with robust turnout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Voters flocked to the polls on Tuesday despite the threat of the coronavirus and the potential of long lines to choose between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, in an election that will influence how the U.S. confronts everything from the pandemic to race relations for years to come.

23. Pandemic tests shopper loyalty for clothing brands -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Archie Jafree heard that Lord & Taylor filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in early August, he was sad about the fate of the storied retailer with roots dating back to 1824.

Still, the 36-year-old northern Virginia resident acknowledged he hadn't shopped there in months, preferring instead to go to Nordstrom and Zara, where he feels the customer service is better.

24. Trump admits he's blocking postal cash to stop mail-in votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump frankly acknowledged that he's starving the U.S. Postal Service of money to make it harder to process an expected surge of mail-in ballots, which he worries could cost him reelection.

25. US jobless claims fall below 1 million but remain high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of laid-off workers applying for unemployment aid fell below 1 million last week for the first time since the viral pandemic intensified five months ago, yet still remains at a high level. The pandemic keeps forcing layoffs just as the expiration of a $600-a-week federal jobless benefit has deepened the hardships for many.

26. 'Too many are selfish': US nears 5 million virus cases -

BOSTON (AP) — Fourth of July gatherings, graduation parties, no-mask weddings, crowded bars — there are reasons the U.S. has racked up more than 155,000 coronavirus deaths, by far the most of any country, and is fast approaching an off-the-charts 5 million confirmed infections, easily the highest in the world.

27. Dodging virus, Navy ships break record for staying at sea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The two U.S. warships in the Middle East weren't aiming to break a record.

But when the coronavirus made ship stops in foreign countries too risky, the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower and the USS San Jacinto were ordered to keep moving and avoid all port visits.

28. DC Guard to investigate helicopter maneuvers to show force -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Guard of the District of Columbia is investigating the use of one of its helicopters to make a "show of force" against protesters near the White House, while President Donald Trump is encouraging authorities to get tougher to quell the unrest over George Floyd's death.

29. DC officials push back on aggressive response to protests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Officials in the nation's capital pushed back on an aggressive response by the federal government to demonstrations over the death of George Floyd, with the mayor flatly rejecting a Trump administration proposal for the federal government to take over its police force and one Virginia county pulling its officers from Washington.

30. Esper says no military for protests as standby troops leave -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Wednesday he opposes using military forces for law enforcement in containing current street protests, tamping down threats from President Donald Trump, who had warned states he was willing to send troops to "dominate" the streets.

31. Barr: Law enforcement must 'dominate' streets amid protests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials vowed to "maximize federal law enforcement presence" in the nation's capital after days of violent demonstrations led to fires across Washington and left scores of businesses with broken windows and dozens of police officers injured.

32. Most states still fall short of recommended testing levels -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As businesses reopened Friday in more of the U.S., an overwhelming majority of states still fall short of the COVID-19 testing levels that public health experts say are necessary to safely ease lockdowns and avoid another deadly wave of outbreaks, according to an Associated Press analysis.

33. Gloomy summer looms as pandemic cancels US festivals, trips -

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Thelma Uranga is sprucing up her back deck in Chicago, hoping to host some small gatherings to take the place of the summer's usual neighborhood festivals built on music, food and time with friends.

34. Pandemic exposes gaps in travel insurance coverage -

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — For many people, travel insurance has been little more than a box that pops up on a booking site to offer some cheap peace of mind.

But the coverage's limitations have been brought into stark relief during the coronavirus pandemic, leaving would-be travelers frustrated over denied claims for hundreds — if not thousands — of dollars.

35. Chipotle agrees to record $25 million fine over tainted food -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. agreed Tuesday to pay a record $25 million fine to resolve criminal charges that it served tainted food that sickened more than 1,100 people in the U.S. from 2015 to 2018, federal prosecutors said.

36. Charities steered $65M to Trump lawyer Sekulow, family -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jay Sekulow, one of President Donald Trump's lead attorneys during the impeachment trial, is being paid for his legal work through a rented $80-a-month mailbox a block away from the White House.

37. Considering a Roth conversion? Get expert advice -

If you’ve saved a lot for retirement, or your parents have, you could be affected by recent changes in the rules about retirement distributions.

The recently enacted Secure Act eliminated the “stretch IRA,” a strategy used by affluent investors to pass tax-advantaged money to their heirs.

38. FirstBank merging with Franklin Synergy -

FB Financial Corporation, parent company of FirstBank, and Franklin Financial Network, Inc., parent company of Franklin Synergy Bank, have jointly announced their entry into a definitive merger agreement pursuant to which Franklin will be merged with and into FB Financial.

39. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

40. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for December 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, December 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

41. Tennessee Q3 exports fell $500M from year ago -

Tennessee’s exports fell by more than $500 million for the third quarter compared to the same period last year, a 6.6% loss, the latest “Global Commerce” trade report from MTSU’s Business and Economic Research Center finds.

42. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for November 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

43. Beverage companies aim to get bottles recycled, not trashed -

Every year, an estimated 100 billion plastic bottles are produced in the U.S., the bulk of which come from three of America's biggest beverage companies: Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Keurig Dr Pepper.

The problem? Only one-third of those bottles get recycled; the rest end up in the trash.

44. Newspaper chain GateHouse buying Gannett, USA Today owner -

NEW YORK (AP) — Two of the country's largest newspaper companies have agreed to combine in the latest media deal driven by the industry's struggles with a decline in printed editions.

GateHouse Media, a chain backed by an investment firm, is buying USA Today owner Gannett Co. for $12.06 a share in cash and stock, or about $1.4 billion. The combined company would have more than 260 daily papers in the U.S. along with more than 300 weeklies. It would be the largest U.S. newspaper company by far, with a print circulation of 8.7 million, 7 million more than the new No. 2, McClatchy, according to media expert Ken Doctor.

45. Court rejects challenge to regulation of gun silencers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court rejected a challenge to federal regulation of gun silencers Monday, just days after a gunman used one in a shooting rampage that killed 12 people in Virginia.

46. Stallings’ value to UT felt beyond the diamond -

Garrett Stallings spotted the little boy in the orange Tennessee shirt as he was walking off the field.

The Vols had just outlasted Texas A&M in 14 innings at Blue Bell Park in College Station and were packing up to make the trip back to Knoxville.

47. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for April 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, April 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

48. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for March 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

49. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for January 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

50. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for January 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, January 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

51. Trump thanks Saudis after defying calls to punish prince -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump publicly thanked Saudi Arabia for plunging oil prices just a day after he was harshly criticized for deciding not to further punish the kingdom for the killing of U.S.-based columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

52. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's rhetoric on voter fraud is misleading -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing closely contested election races in Florida and Arizona, President Donald Trump is spreading misleading rhetoric regarding voting fraud.

He says votes are suspiciously appearing "out of the wilderness" in Arizona after Election Day to boost the Democratic candidate in the Senate race. It's actually typical for the state to take additional days after an election to finish tabulating mail-in votes.

53. 'Uninvited brute': Hurricane Florence pounds the Carolinas -

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence lumbered ashore in North Carolina with howling 90 mph winds and terrifying storm surge early Friday, splintering buildings and trapping hundreds of people in high water as it settled in for what could be a long and extraordinarily destructive drenching.

54. Storm's uncertain track sows fear; 10 million in crosshairs -

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence put a corridor of more than 10 million people in the crosshairs Wednesday as the monster storm closed in on the Carolinas, uncertainty over its projected path spreading worry across a widening swath of the Southeast.

55. 'Don't play games with it': Florence takes aim at Southeast -

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — People who thought they were relatively safe from the onslaught of Hurricane Florence began boarding up and Georgia's governor declared a state of emergency Wednesday as uncertainty over the path of the monster storm spread worry along the Southeastern coast.

56. Surge, wind, rain, floods: Hurricane Florence could hit hard -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence churned Tuesday toward the Eastern Seaboard as a storm of "staggering" size, forcing a million people to evacuate the coast. Many more were left to wonder where they might be safe if days of torrential rains unleash floods from the mountains to the sea.

57. Park, load, go: Amazon brings grocery pickup to Whole Foods -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon, known for bringing items to shoppers' homes, is adding a curbside pickup option at Whole Foods for Prime members.

Shoppers will be able to order eggs, milk and other groceries on the Prime Now app and park in reserved spaces for workers will place the items in their cars.

58. Allergies, glaciers, pikas: climate change in action -

WASHINGTON (AP) — You don't just feel the heat of global warming, you can see it in action all around. Some examples of where climate change's effects have been measured:

—Glaciers across the globe are melting and retreating, with 279 billion tons of ice lost since 2002, according to NASA's GRACE satellite. Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland is flowing faster than any other glacier on Earth. In 2012, it hit a record pace of about 75 inches per hour (1.9 meters). In 2017, it slowed down to 40 inches per hour (1 meter). The Portage Glacier in Alaska has retreated so much it cannot be seen from the visitor center that opened in 1986.

59. Not just heat: Climate change signs can be seen all around -

WASHINGTON (AP) — You don't just feel the heat of global warming, you can see it in action all around.

Some examples of where climate change's effects have been measured:

—Glaciers across the globe are melting and retreating, with 279 billion tons of ice lost since 2002, according to NASA's GRACE satellite. Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland is flowing faster than any other glacier on Earth. In 2012, it hit a record pace of about 75 inches per hour (1.9 meters). In 2017, it slowed down to 40 inches per hour (1 meter). The Portage Glacier in Alaska has retreated so much it cannot be seen from the visitor center that opened in 1986.

60. In SC primary, ardent Trump backer defeats Rep. Mark Sanford -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — President Donald Trump is crediting his Election-Day tweet in part for the defeat of a South Carolina Republican congressman who has been critical of his administration.

Trump tweeted Wednesday that his advisers didn't want him to get involved in the Republican primary, thinking Rep. Mark Sanford "would easily win."

61. Soggy Alberto triggers mudslides, threatens dam failure -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Mudslides triggered by the soggy remnants of Alberto forced evacuations below a dam and closed an interstate highway in the western mountains of North Carolina on Wednesday.

62. Lobbyist tied to Pruitt pushed client's committee candidates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The lobbyist whose wife rented a condo to Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt at $50 a night sought EPA committee posts for a lobbying client, according to a newly released EPA memo.

63. Trump likes coal, but that doesn't mean he's hostile to wind -

BOSTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has courted coal miners and cast doubt on whether fossils fuel contribute to climate change, but that hasn't translated into hostility for renewable energy — particularly offshore wind.

64. AP-NORC Poll: Americans expect Russia tension will get worse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans largely fear the country's relationship with Russia and China will get worse in the coming year, and despite signs of diplomatic progress with Kim Jong Un on nuclear weapons, nearly half say the same about North Korea.

65. Airline new to Nashville under fire after '60 Minutes' safety report -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Allegiant Air shares continue to fall in the aftermath of a news report that is raising serious safety questions about the low-cost carrier.

Allegiant is defending its safety and says the report by CBS News' "60 Minutes" tells a "false narrative" about the airline. Investors, however, fear that the negative publicity will cause travelers to avoid Allegiant, which has a fleet including many older planes that typically require more maintenance.

66. Stones exhibit shines a light on Musicians Hall -

The tall, smiling fellow dressed in black – and with a slight, rockabilly hair-flip tickling his forehead – stops and points at a black guitar in a display case and nods.

“I’ve been instructed that if all hell breaks loose and fire burns up everything else, I’m supposed to grab that guitar and get it out of here ….

67. Who starts on defense? You’ll have to wait -

Jeremy Pruitt hasn’t been afraid to change things around during his first spring practice as Tennessee’s head football coach.

First, he’s holding off until scrimmages (at least) before he talks about individual players, a change of protocol from his predecessor, Butch Jones.

68. Book Trump? Interest groups press case at his properties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Payday lenders got regulators to rethink rules on how closely to vet borrowers. E-cigarette makers got a delay in federal oversight of many vaping products. Candy makers praised a decision to hold off on more stringent labeling standards. And title insurers declared "victory" for getting changes that benefited them in the tax overhaul.

69. Fisk receives $1M gift from board member -

Fisk University has announced a $1 million gift from Robert W. Norton, a retired Pfizer executive and member of the Fisk University Board of Trustees, and his wife Janice. The Norton’s gift will be used to provide scholarships for deserving students.

70. Kale to go: Amazon to roll out delivery at Whole Foods -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is bringing its speedy delivery to Whole Foods. The online retail giant plans to roll out two-hour delivery at the organic grocer this year to those who pay for Amazon's $99-a-year Prime membership. It is the company's biggest move since it bought the organic grocer last year.

71. Kale to go: Amazon to roll out delivery at Whole Foods -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon delivery is coming to Whole Foods. The online retailing giant plans to roll out two-hour delivery at the organic grocer this year to those who pay for Amazon's $99-a-year Prime membership.

72. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 690 commercial real estate transactions worth $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 333, followed by Williamson (152), Rutherford (104), Sumner (51) and Wilson (50).

73. Another GOP governor seeks exclusion from drilling proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Opposition to the Trump administration's plan to expand offshore drilling is mounting as Democrats from coastal states accuse President Donald Trump of punishing states with Democratic leaders and a second Republican governor asks to withdraw his state from the plan.

74. Local governments won't say what they're offering Amazon -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — State and local governments have been more than happy to play up the amenities they think make their locations the best choice for Amazon's second headquarters. But many of them will not disclose the tax breaks or other financial incentives they are offering the online giant.

75. Local governments won't say what they're offering Amazon -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — State and local governments have been more than happy to play up the amenities they think make their locations the best choice for Amazon's second headquarters. But many of them will not disclose the tax breaks or other financial incentives they are offering the online giant.

76. Another GOP governor seeks exclusion from drilling proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Opposition to the Trump administration's plan to expand offshore drilling is mounting as Democrats from coastal states accuse President Donald Trump of punishing states with Democratic leaders and a second Republican governor asks to withdraw his state from the plan.

77. Dems say Trump action on Florida drilling guided by politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats from coastal states accused the Trump administration of punishing states with Democratic leaders after the administration said it would block oil drilling off Florida's coast following objections from that state's Republican governor.

78. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for November 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

79. Lipman Group joins Re/Max Collection -

Lipman Group is partnering with The RE/MAX Collection Fine Homes & Luxury Properties, the luxury division of the RE/MAX pervasive brand. Effective immediately, Lipman Group will don the name RE/MAX Homes and Estates, Lipman Group.

80. Davenport at home on sideline, on air, in Nashville -

We know her as one of Nashville’s broadcast treasures, but she is something altogether different for the 5-year-old boy and his 2-year-old sister watching college football games, their eyes more focused on sidelines reports than gridiron action, in the family living room in Peachtree City, Georgia.

81. Women who own businesses find bank loans harder to get -

NEW YORK (AP) — Getting a bank loan is still a struggle for many women who own businesses.

Kirsten Curry has had three rejections in the past six months and is waiting to hear from a fourth bank. Curry, owner of Seattle-based Leading Retirement Solutions, has applied to national banks, a regional bank and a credit union. The problem is that her 8-year-old retirement advisory firm lost money last year as it invested in technology to help it expand. Although revenue has consistently risen and her company has no debt, her expenses last year were a red flag.

82. Solar eclipse signals biggest day at Clarksville airport -

Clarksville Regional Airport set a single-day record on the day of the solar eclipse as eclipse viewers flocked to the area, which lay in the “path of totality.”

“The total solar eclipse was a great day for the airport. Clarksville Regional safely supported the arrival and departure of 161 aircraft – ranging from light-sport aircraft to multi-passenger charter jets on Monday,” Airport Manager John Patterson says. “Not only did we welcome a record-number of aircraft, we had the opportunity to offer fuel sales and services to them. Pilots and their passengers not only got to experience totality, but they also enjoyed the great Clarksville experience we provide here at CKV. Our staff received so many compliments about the airport, and the ease of working with us during an unusually high-traffic day.”

83. Finding Nashville while searching for America -

Merle Haggard likely is playing in the head of the man I spot, tiny dogs dancing at his feet, as he puffs on a thick stogie atop an asphalt knoll in the middle of Nashville.

“Down every road, there’s always one more city,” a line from Hag’s “I’m A Lonesome Fugitive” is the motto of the man, his mate for life (and road buddy) and their two dogs.

84. Oldest white supremacist site shut down after complaint -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The founder of the internet's oldest white supremacist site said he was trying to get back online Monday after a company revoked its domain name following complaints that it promotes hatred and is linked to dozens of murders.

85. Trump defends Confederate statues, berates his critics -

RIDGEWATER, N.J. (AP) — With prominent Republicans openly questioning his competence and moral leadership, President Donald Trump burrowed deeper into the racially charged debate over Confederate memorials and lashed out at members of his own party in the latest controversy to engulf his presidency.

86. High-tech US plants offer jobs even as the laid-off struggle -

NORWOOD, Ohio (AP) — Herbie Mays is 3M proud, and it shows — in the 3M shirt he wears; in the 3M ring he earned after three decades at the company's plant in suburban Cincinnati; in the way he shows off a card from a 3M supervisor, praising Mays as "a GREAT employee."

87. Trump signs order aimed at opening Arctic drilling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Working to dismantle his predecessor's environmental legacy, President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday aimed at expanding oil drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans.

88. Missing Tennessee student found with teacher in California -

COLUMBIA (AP) — After being missing for more than a month, a 15-year-old Tennessee girl was found near a cabin in a remote part of northern California and the 50-year-old teacher accused of kidnapping her was arrested, authorities said.

89. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for September 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, September 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

90. Grading the Vols -

Tennessee’s football team is spending this week’s open date trying to get healthy after a rugged four-game stretch of SEC football in which they defeated Florida and Georgia and lost to Texas A&M and Alabama.

91. Hendersonville's Hurd eyes the record -

Jalen Hurd knows right where he stands among Tennessee’s running backs of the past and wants to be No. 1 in career rushing yards at the end of the 2016 season.

The junior from Hendersonville Beech High School needs 892 yards to surpass Travis Henry as UT’s career rushing leader.

92. Insurer Aetna slashes ACA exchange participation to 4 states -

Aetna has become the latest health insurer to retreat from the Affordable Care Act's public exchanges by announcing a pullback that will further deplete customer choices in many pockets of the country.

93. Alpiar’s rags-to-riches story also could be a play -

COOKEVILLE – “Fearless!” is a musical dramedy about the stages of love over the generations, with most problems solved through humor.

People have told Hal Alpiar that the music is comparable to a modern-day “West Side Story” or “Sound of Music,” without the Sharks and Jets or the Nazis and the nanny, of course.

94. Top Middle Tennessee commercial real estate transactions for April 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, April 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

95. US bars Atlantic drilling; Obama builds environmental legacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a major reversal, the Obama administration said Tuesday it will bar oil drilling in the Atlantic Ocean, a move cheered by environmentalists and consistent with the president's aggressive steps to combat climate change.

96. Lovingly baked: Slice of heaven in Berry Hill -

Thick coffee and baked pie aromas mingling inside the tidy building signal I’ve found perfect refuge from the storms of life. All the damned snow. And then the cold rain. Waiting for the sun.

97. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for January 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

98. UT's Jones builds for championship run with staff tweaks -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones got serious about taking the next step with his football program not long after his team’s 45-6 victory over Northwestern in the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl.

Jones fired defensive coordinator John Jancek on Jan. 6, and three days later hired his top candidate for the opening, Bob Shoop of Penn State.

99. Top Middle Tennessee commercial real estate transactions for August 2015 -

Top commercial real estate transactions, August 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

100. From Banner to bankruptcy -

More than 17 years after the Nashville Banner ceased publication, another chapter in the story – perhaps the last – has been written in Winchester’s Eastern District bankruptcy court with the final disposition of Irby C. Simpkins Jr.’s Chapter 7 case.