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Editorial Results (free)

1. CDC drops quarantine, distancing recommendations for COVID -

NEW YORK (AP) — The nation's top public health agency relaxed its COVID-19 guidelines Thursday, dropping the recommendation that Americans quarantine themselves if they come into close contact with an infected person.

2. US will stretch monkeypox vaccine supply with smaller doses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday authorized a plan to stretch the nation's limited supply of monkeypox vaccine by giving people just one-fifth the usual dose, citing research suggesting that the reduced amount is about as effective.

3. Advocates: Senate bill means environmental health, also harm -

Billions of dollars in climate and environment investments could flow to communities in the United States that have been plagued by pollution and climate threats for decades, if the proposed Inflation Reduction Act becomes law. The bill, announced by Sens. Chuck Schumer and Joe Manchin last month, could also jumpstart a transition to clean energy in regions still dominated by fossil fuels.

4. Even simple exercise may help aging brain, study hints -

New research hints that even a simple exercise routine just might help older Americans with mild memory problems.

Doctors have long advised physical activity to help keep a healthy brain fit. But the government-funded study marks the longest test of whether exercise makes any difference once memory starts to slide — research performed amid a pandemic that added isolation to the list of risks to participants' brain health.

5. US rules out summer COVID boosters to focus on fall campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators said Friday they are no longer considering authorizing a second COVID-19 booster shot for all adults under 50 this summer, focusing instead on revamped vaccines for the fall that will target the newest viral subvariants.

6. US signs off on 800,000 more doses of monkeypox vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After weeks of delays, nearly 800,000 doses of the monkeypox vaccine will soon be available for distribution, U.S. health regulators said Wednesday.

The announcement comes amid growing criticism that authorities have been too slow in deploying the vaccine, potentially missing the window to contain what could soon become an entrenched infectious disease.

7. FDA chief's long-promised opioid review faces skepticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As U.S. opioid deaths mounted in 2016, the incoming head of the Food and Drug Administration promised a "sweeping review" of prescription painkillers in hopes of reversing the worst overdose epidemic in American history.

8. New studies bolster theory coronavirus emerged from the wild -

Two new studies provide more evidence that the coronavirus pandemic originated in a Wuhan, China market where live animals were sold – further bolstering the theory that the virus emerged in the wild rather than escaping from a Chinese lab.

9. Monkeypox virus could become entrenched as new STD in the US -

NEW YORK (AP) — The spread of monkeypox in the U.S. could represent the dawn of a new sexually transmitted disease, though some health officials say the virus that causes pimple-like bumps might yet be contained before it gets firmly established.

10. Beloved monarch butterflies now listed as endangered -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The monarch butterfly fluttered a step closer to extinction Thursday, as scientists put the iconic orange-and-black insect on the endangered list because of its fast dwindling numbers.

11. CDC endorses more traditional Novavax COVID shot for adults -

U.S. adults who haven't gotten any COVID-19 shots yet should consider a new option from Novavax -- a more traditional kind of vaccine, health officials said Tuesday.

Regulators authorized the nation's first so-called protein vaccine against COVID-19 last week, but the final hurdle was a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

12. Experts rue simple steps not taken before latest COVID surge -

With new omicron variants again driving COVID-19 hospital admissions and deaths higher in recent weeks, states and cities are rethinking their responses and the White House is stepping up efforts to alert the public.

13. US regulators clear way for more monkeypox vaccine shipments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands more doses of monkeypox vaccine are expected to soon begin shipping to the U.S. after federal health officials said they had completed an inspection of the overseas plant where they were manufactured.

14. Experts rue simple steps not taken before latest COVID surge -

With new omicron variants again driving COVID-19 hospital admissions and deaths higher in recent weeks, states and cities are rethinking their responses and the White House is stepping up efforts to alert the public.

15. Masks could return to Los Angeles as COVID surges nationwide -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Nick Barragan is used to wearing a mask because his job in the Los Angeles film industry has long required it, so he won't be fazed if the nation's most populous county reinstates rules requiring face coverings because of another spike in coronavirus cases across the country.

16. New coronavirus mutant raises concerns in India and beyond -

The quickly changing coronavirus has spawned yet another super contagious omicron mutant that's worrying scientists as it gains ground in India and pops up in numerous other countries, including the United States.

17. Over-the-counter birth control? Drugmaker seeks FDA approval -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time, a pharmaceutical company has asked for permission to sell a birth control pill over the counter in the U.S.

HRA Pharma's application on Monday sets up a high-stakes decision for health regulators amid legal and political battles over women's reproductive health. The company says the timing was unrelated to the Supreme Court's recent decision overturning Roe v. Wade.

18. Juul, FDA suspend court case while e-cigarette ban on hold -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration and Juul agreed Wednesday to put their court fight on hold while the government reopens its review of the company's electronic cigarettes.

The agreement comes one day after the FDA placed a hold on its initial order banning Juul's products from the market, saying that Juul's application warranted "additional review."

19. US allows pharmacists to prescribe Pfizer's COVID-19 pill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pharmacists can prescribe the leading COVID-19 pill directly to patients under a new U.S. policy announced Wednesday that's intended to expand use of Pfizer's drug Paxlovid.

The Food and Drug Administration said pharmacists can begin screening patients to see if they are eligible for Paxlovid and then prescribe the medication, which has been shown to curb the worst effects of COVID-19. Previously only physicians could prescribe the antiviral drug.

20. US buys 105 million COVID vaccine doses for fall campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials said Wednesday they have agreed to purchase another 105 million doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine in anticipation of a fall booster campaign.

The $3.2 billion deal announced by the Biden administration comes as federal scientists consider how to update the vaccines to better protect Americans from the rapidly evolving virus. Federal officials said the purchase agreement includes the option to purchase a total of 300 million doses, including a mix of doses for both adults and children.

21. Landquist takes office as TBA vice president -

Nashville attorney Edward D. Lanquist Jr. has been installed as vice president of the Tennessee Bar Association and will advance to the presidency in 2024.

Lanquist has been active in the Tennessee Bar Association and other legal and community organizations for many years, serving most recently as the TBA’s general counsel. He is on the faculty of the Nashville School of Law, is a past president of the Nashville Bar Association and past president of the Tennessee Intellectual Property Association. He holds engineering and law degrees from the University of Tennessee and is a co-founder of Patterson Intellectual Property Law.

22. US grapples with whether to modify COVID vaccine for fall -

U.S. health authorities are facing a critical decision: whether to offer new COVID-19 booster shots this fall that are modified to better match recent changes of the shape-shifting coronavirus.

Moderna and Pfizer have tested updated shots against the super-contagious omicron variant, and advisers to the Food and Drug Administration will debate Tuesday if it's time to make a switch — setting the stage for similar moves by other countries.

23. Juul seeks to block FDA ban on its e-cigarettes in US -

Juul on Friday asked a federal court to block a government order to stop selling its electronic cigarettes.

The e-cigarette maker asked the court to pause what it calls an "extraordinary and unlawful action" by the Food and Drug Administration. The company filed an emergency motion with the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington as it prepares to appeal the FDA's decision.

24. Experts endorse Moderna COVID-19 shots for kids ages 6 to 17 -

NEW YORK (AP) — An expert panel backed a second COVID-19 vaccine option for kids ages 6 to 17 Thursday.

Advisers to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted unanimously to recommend Moderna shots as an option for school-age kids and adolescents. This group has been able to get shots shots made by Pfizer since last year.

25. FDA bans Juul e-cigarettes tied to teen vaping surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Thursday ordered Juul to pull its electronic cigarettes from the market, the latest blow to the embattled company widely blamed for sparking a national surge in teen vaping.

26. FDA advisers back Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine for older kids -

NEW YORK (AP) — A government advisory panel Tuesday endorsed a second brand of COVID-19 vaccine for school-age children and teens.

The Food and Drug Administration's outside experts voted unanimously that Moderna's vaccine is safe and effective enough to give kids ages 6 to 17. If the FDA agrees, it would become the second option for those children, joining Pfizer's vaccine.

27. US abortions rise: 1 in 5 pregnancies terminated in 2020 -

The number and rate of U.S. abortions increased from 2017 to 2020 after a long decline, according to figures released Wednesday.

The report from the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports abortion rights, counted more than 930,000 abortions in the U.S. in 2020. That's up from about 862,000 abortions in 2017, when national abortion figures reached their lowest point since the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that legalized the procedure nationwide.

28. US: Pfizer COVID-19 shot appears effective for kids under 5 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials said Sunday that kid-sized doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccines appear to be safe and effective for kids under 5, a key step toward a long-awaited decision to begin vaccinating the youngest American children.

29. Many baby formula plants weren't inspected because of COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators have historically inspected baby formula plants at least once a year, but they did not inspect any of the three biggest manufacturers in 2020, according to federal records reviewed by The Associated Press.

30. FDA advisers back Novavax COVID shots as 4th US option -

American adults who haven't yet gotten vaccinated against COVID-19 may soon get another choice, as advisers to the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday backed a more traditional type of shot.

Next, the FDA must decide whether to authorize the protein vaccine made by latecomer Novavax as the nation's fourth coronavirus shot for adults. It's made with more conventional technology than today's dominant Pfizer and Moderna shots and the lesser-used Johnson & Johnson option.

31. Moderna says updated COVID shot boosts omicron protection -

Moderna's experimental COVID-19 vaccine that combines its original shot with protection against the omicron variant appears to work, the company announced Wednesday.

COVID-19 vaccine makers are studying updated boosters that might be offered in the fall to better protect people against future coronavirus surges.

32. Novavax hopes its COVID shot wins over FDA, vaccine holdouts -

GAITHERSBURG, Md. (AP) — Americans may soon get a new COVID-19 vaccine option -- shots made with a more tried-and-true technology than today's versions. The big question: Why should they care?

33. Carbon emissions dip, at least briefly, in China, study says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — China, the world's top emitter of carbon dioxide that causes global warming, has seen a notable dip in its emissions over the past three quarters — but it's not clear how long the drop will continue.

34. Long COVID affects more older adults; shots don't prevent it -

New U.S. research on long COVID-19 provides fresh evidence that it can happen even after breakthrough infections in vaccinated people, and that older adults face higher risks for the long-term effects.

35. FDA chief under fire for slow response to baby formula issue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Food and Drug Administration faced bipartisan fury from House lawmakers Wednesday over months of delays investigating problems at the nation's largest baby formula plant that prompted an ongoing shortage.

36. Pfizer to offer low-cost medicines, vaccines to poor nations -

Pfizer said Wednesday that it will provide nearly two dozen products, including its top-selling COVID-19 vaccine and treatment, at not-for-profit prices in some of the world's poorest countries.

The drugmaker announced the program at the World Economic Forum's annual gathering in Davos, Switzerland, and said it was aimed at improving health equity in 45 lower-income countries. Most of the countries are in Africa, but the list also includes Haiti, Syria, Cambodia and North Korea.

37. US safety, savings rules set stage for baby formula shortage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A massive recall is getting most of the blame for the U.S. baby formula shortage, but experts say the products have long been vulnerable to this type of crisis due to decades-old policies that have allowed a handful of companies to corner the market.

38. Pfizer says 3 COVID shots protect children under 5 -

Three doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine offer strong protection for children younger than 5, the company announced Monday. Pfizer plans to give the data to U.S. regulators later this week in a step toward letting the littlest kids get the shots.

39. FDA head: Baby formula factory could reopen by next week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Food and Drug Administration told lawmakers Thursday that a shuttered baby formula factory could be up and running as soon as next week, though he sidestepped questions about whether his agency should have intervened earlier to address problems at the plant that have triggered the national shortage.

40. Lawmakers grill FDA commissioner over baby formula shortage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Food and Drug Administration faced congressional lawmakers for the first time Thursday over the shortage of baby formula that has rattled American parents and become a growing political liability for President Joe Biden.

41. A third of US should be considering masks, officials say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 cases are increasing in the United States – and could get even worse over the coming months, federal health officials warned Wednesday in urging areas hardest hit to consider reissuing calls for indoor masking.

42. FDA clears COVID booster shot for healthy kids ages 5 to 11 -

U.S. regulators on Tuesday authorized a COVID-19 booster shot for healthy 5- to 11-year-olds, hoping an extra vaccine dose will enhance their protection as infections once again creep upward.

Everyone 12 and older already was supposed to get one booster dose for the best protection against the newest coronavirus variants -- and some people, including those 50 and older, can choose a second booster.

43. Starbucks will cover travel for workers seeking abortions -

Starbucks said Monday it will pay the travel expenses for U.S. employees to access abortion and gender-confirmation procedures if those services aren't available within 100 milof a worker's home.

The Seattle coffee giant said it will also make the travel benefit available to the dependents of employees who are enrolled in Starbucks' health care plan. Starbucks has 240,000 U.S. employees but the company didn't say what percentage of them are enrolled in the its health care plan.

44. EXPLAINER: What's behind the baby formula shortage? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many parents are hunting for infant formula after a combination of short- and long-term problems hit most of the biggest U.S. brands.

Millions of babies in the U.S. rely on formula, which is the only source of nutrition recommended for infants who aren't exclusively breastfed.

45. Parents hunting for baby formula as shortage spans US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Parents across the U.S. are scrambling to find baby formula because supply disruptions and a massive safety recall have swept many leading brands off store shelves.

Months of spot shortages at pharmacies and supermarkets have been exacerbated by the recall at Abbott, which was forced to shutter its largest U.S. formula manufacturing plant in February due to contamination concerns.

46. Rare cases of COVID returning pose questions for Pfizer pill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As more doctors prescribe Pfizer's powerful COVID-19 pill, new questions are emerging about its performance, including why a small number of patients appear to relapse after taking the drug.

47. Nearly 1 million COVID-19 deaths: A look at the US numbers -

Doug Lambrecht was among the first of the nearly 1 million Americans to die from COVID-19. His demographic profile — an older white male with chronic health problems — mirrors the faces of many who would be lost over the next two years.

48. FDA restricts J&J's COVID-19 vaccine due to blood clot risk -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators on Thursday strictly limited who can receive Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine due to the ongoing risk of rare but serious blood clots.

The Food and Drug Administration said the shot should only be given to adults who cannot receive a different vaccine or specifically request J&J's vaccine. U.S. authorities for months have recommended that Americans get Pfizer or Moderna shots instead of J&J's vaccine.

49. HBCU medical schools to tackle organ transplant disparities -

A new initiative aimed at increasing the number of Black Americans registered as organ donors and combating disparities among transplant recipients was announced Thursday by a coalition that includes the four medical schools at the nation's historically Black colleges and universities.

50. FDA sets June meetings on COVID vaccines for youngest kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Friday set tentative dates in June to publicly review COVID-19 vaccines for the youngest American children, typically the final step before authorizing the shots.

51. Racial split on COVID-19 endures as restrictions ease in US -

Black and Hispanic Americans remain far more cautious in their approach to COVID-19 than white Americans, recent polls show, reflecting diverging preferences on how to deal with the pandemic as federal, state and local restrictions fall by the wayside.

52. FDA to issue plan banning menthol in cigarettes, cigars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government on Thursday released its long-awaited plan to ban menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars, citing the toll on Black smokers and young people.

"The proposed rules would help prevent children from becoming the next generation of smokers and help adult smokers quit," said Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra, in a statement.

53. Moderna seeks to be 1st with COVID shots for youngest children -

Moderna on Thursday asked U.S. regulators to authorize low doses of its COVID-19 vaccine for children younger than 6, a long-awaited move toward potentially opening shots for millions of tots by summer.

54. Jones Company sold to Richmond -

Richmond American Homes of Tennessee has entered into an asset purchase agreement to acquire substantially all of the homebuilding assets of The Jones Company of Tennessee, LLC.

Jones closed over 370 homes in fiscal year 2021 in the Nashville area with an average sales price of $564,000, generating revenues of $209 million.

55. Plan to ban menthol cigarettes prompts late lobbying blitz -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As federal officials finalize a long-awaited plan to ban menthol cigarettes, dozens of interest groups have met with White House staffers to try to influence the process, which has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives while wiping out billions in tobacco sales.

56. Moderna announces step toward updating COVID shots for fall -

Moderna hopes to offer updated COVID-19 boosters in the fall that combine its original vaccine with protection against the omicron variant. On Tuesday, it reported a preliminary hint that such an approach might work.

57. E-cigs using synthetic nicotine come under FDA oversight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators will soon begin cracking down on vaping companies using a now-closed loophole, including a line of fruit-flavored e-cigarettes that have become teenagers' top choice.

58. Pfizer to seek COVID booster for healthy 5- to 11-year-olds -

Pfizer said Thursday it wants to expand its COVID-19 booster shots to healthy elementary-age kids.

U.S. health authorities already urge everyone 12 and older to get one booster dose for the best protection against the newest variants -- and recently gave the option of a second booster to those 50 and older.

59. US experts discuss COVID boosters for the fall and beyond -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While many Americans are trying to move on with their lives after two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. health officials are debating the best way to use vaccines to stay ahead of the coronavirus.

60. US pulls GSK's COVID drug as omicron sibling dominates cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — GlaxoSmithKline's IV drug for COVID-19 should no longer be used because it is likely ineffective against the omicron subvariant that now accounts for most U.S. cases, federal health regulators said Tuesday.

61. FDA panel narrowly sides against experimental ALS drug -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health advisers on Wednesday narrowly ruled against an experimental drug for the debilitating illness known as Lou Gehrig's disease, a potential setback for patient groups who have lobbied for the medication's approval.

62. FDA OKs another Pfizer, Moderna COVID booster for 50 and up -

Americans 50 and older can get a second COVID-19 booster if it's been at least four months since their last vaccination, a chance at extra protection for the most vulnerable in case the coronavirus rebounds.

63. Moderna says its low-dose COVID shots work for kids younger than 6 -

Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine works in babies, toddlers and preschoolers the company announced Wednesday -- and if regulators agree it could mean a chance to finally start vaccinating the littlest kids by summer.

64. FDA details problems at plant behind recalled baby formula -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Baby formula maker Abbott failed to maintain sanitary conditions and procedures at the Michigan manufacturing plant recently linked to a cluster of infant illnesses, according to findings released Tuesday by federal safety inspectors.

65. UK easing COVID-19 testing, monitoring despite case uptick -

LONDON (AP) — After dropping nearly all coronavirus restrictions last month, Britain is now ending some of its most widespread COVID-19 testing and monitoring programs, a move some scientists fear will complicate efforts to track the virus and detect worrisome new variants.

66. How will COVID end? Experts look to past epidemics for clues -

NEW YORK (AP) — Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, most of the world has seen a dramatic improvement in infections, hospitalizations and death rates in recent weeks, signaling the crisis appears to be winding down. But how will it end? Past epidemics may provide clues.

67. EXPLAINER: Why Pfizer needs time to make COVID-19 treatment -

Pfizer's new COVID-19 treatment came with a catch when it debuted late last year: Supplies were limited, and it can take months to make the tablets.

Company leaders say they are expanding production and expect big gains in the next several months. That could help if another wave of cases develops.

68. Attorney, teacher joins GSRM Law -

The law firm of Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin PLLC bas brought M. Clark Spoden into the firm as a partner in the firm’s litigation section.

His practice is focused on the representation of companies in contract, employment, environmental, administrative law, construction, business tort, noncompetition, intellectual property, wrongful death and personal injury cases.

69. Pregnancy-related deaths climbed in pandemic's first year -

Pregnancy-related deaths for U.S. mothers climbed higher in the pandemic's first year, continuing a decades-long trend that disproportionately affects Black people, according to a government report released Wednesday.

70. EXPLAINER: Why would world leaders balk at giving Putin DNA? -

If knowledge is power, knowing the intimate secrets of one's DNA could be a powerful weapon. That might explain why the world leaders who hastened to Moscow in recent days for diplomatic talks seemed to balk at Russian-administered coronavirus tests.

71. Senate confirms Biden's FDA pick despite political divisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate narrowly confirmed President Joe Biden's pick to lead the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday pushing past a thicket of political controversies that threatened to derail what was initially expected to be an easy confirmation.

72. Climate grant illustrates growth in philanthropy-funded news -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Associated Press said Tuesday that it is assigning more than two dozen journalists across the world to cover climate issues, in the news organization's largest single expansion paid for through philanthropic grants.

73. DNA analysis of elephant ivory reveals trafficking networks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As few as three major criminal groups are responsible for smuggling the vast majority of elephant ivory tusks out of Africa, according to a new study.

Researchers used analysis of DNA from seized elephant tusks and evidence such as phone records, license plates, financial records and shipping documents to map trafficking operations across the continent and better understand who was behind the crimes. The study was published Monday in the journal Nature Human Behavior.

74. Delay ahead for Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for kids younger than 5 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday put the brakes on their push to speed Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine to children under 5, creating major uncertainty about how soon the shots could become available.

75. Novavax says protein vaccine works for kids as young as 12 -

Novavax announced Thursday that its COVID-19 vaccine proved safe and effective in a study of 12- to 17-year-olds.

Novavax makes a protein-based vaccine -- a different type than the most widely used shots -- that's a late arrival to the COVID-19 arsenal.

76. CDC proposes softer guidance on opioid prescriptions -

NEW YORK (AP) — The nation's top public health agency on Thursday proposed changing — and in some instances, softening — guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

77. SpaceX satellites falling out of orbit after solar storm -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Spacex's newest fleet of satellites is tumbling out of orbit after being struck by a solar storm.

Up to 40 of the 49 small satellites launched last week have either reentered the atmosphere and burned up, or are on the verge of doing so, the company said in an online update Tuesday night.

78. FDA's agenda in limbo as Biden's nominee stalls in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to lead the Food and Drug Administration has stalled in the narrowly divided Senate, an unexpected setback that could delay decisions on electronic cigarettes and a raft of other high-profile health issues pending at the agency.

79. US gives full approval to Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Monday granted full approval to Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine, a shot that's already been given to tens of millions of Americans since its emergency authorization over a year ago.

80. EXPLAINER: New federal law targets medical bill surprises -

Patients worried about getting hit with an unexpected bill after emergency care gained a layer of protection this month from a new federal law.

The No Surprises Act prevents doctors or hospitals in many situations from billing insured patients higher rates because the care providers are not in their insurer's coverage network.

81. Omicron amps up concerns about long COVID and its causes -

More than a year after a bout with COVID-19, Rebekah Hogan still suffers from severe brain fog, pain and fatigue that leave her unable to do her nursing job or handle household activities.

Long COVID has her questioning her worth as a wife and mother.

82. Hospital patient without COVID shot denied heart transplant -

MENDON, Mass. (AP) — A Boston hospital is defending itself after a man's family claimed he was denied a new heart for refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19, saying most transplant programs around the country set similar requirements to improve patients' chances of survival.

83. Hope seen once the omicron wave increases global immunity -

World health officials are offering hope that the ebbing of the omicron wave could give way to a new, more manageable phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, even as they warn of difficult weeks ahead and the possibility of another, more dangerous variant arising.

84. Pfizer begins testing omicron-matched COVID shots in adults -

Pfizer is enrolling healthy adults to test a reformulated COVID-19 vaccine that matches the hugely contagious omicron variant, to see how it compares with the original shots.

Pfizer and its partner BioNTech announced the study on Tuesday.

85. FDA halts use of antibody drugs that don't work vs. omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 antibody drugs from Regeneron and Eli Lilly should no longer be used because they don't work against the omicron variant that now accounts for nearly all U.S. infections, U.S. health regulators said Monday.

86. US begins offering 1B free COVID tests, but many more needed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time, people across the U.S. can log on to a government website and order free, at-home COVID-19 tests. But the White House push may do little to ease the omicron surge, and experts say Washington will have to do a lot more to fix the country's long-troubled testing system.

87. Insurers, employers start helping more with chronic disease -

Vanessa Akinniyi was stuck in denial about diabetes until a care manager from her health insurer coaxed her out.

The Jacksonville, Florida, resident didn't want to start insulin. All the medicines she tried made her sick.

88. COVID-19 pill rollout stymied by shortages as omicron rages -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two brand-new COVID-19 pills that were supposed to be an important weapon against the pandemic in the U.S. are in short supply and have played little role in the fight against the omicron wave of infections.

89. Omicron might be headed for a rapid drop in Britain, US -

Scientists are seeing signals that COVID-19's alarming omicron wave may have peaked in Britain and is about to do the same in the U.S., at which point cases may start dropping off dramatically.

The reason: The variant has proved so wildly contagious that it may already be running out of people to infect, just a month and a half after it was first detected in South Africa.

90. Omicron surge vexes parents of children too young for shots -

Afternoons with Grammy. Birthday parties. Meeting other toddlers at the park. Parents of children too young to be vaccinated are facing difficult choices as an omicron variant-fueled surge in COVID-19 cases makes every encounter seem risky.

91. COVID case counts may be losing importance amid omicron -

The explosive increase in U.S. coronavirus case counts is raising alarm, but some experts believe the focus should instead be on COVID-19 hospital admissions. And those aren't climbing as fast.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, for one, said Sunday on ABC that with many infections causing few or no symptoms, "it is much more relevant to focus on the hospitalizations as opposed to the total number of cases." Other experts argue that case counts still have value.

92. CDC posts rationale for shorter isolation, quarantine -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday explained the scientific rationale for shortening its COVID-19 isolation and quarantine recommendations, and clarified that the guidance applies to kids as well as adults.

93. How will pandemic end? Omicron clouds forecasts for endgame -

Pandemics do eventually end, even if omicron is complicating the question of when this one will. But it won't be like flipping a light switch: The world will have to learn to coexist with a virus that's not going away.

94. US adds Merck pill as 2nd easy-to-use drug against COVID-19 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Thursday authorized the second pill against COVID-19, providing another easy-to-use medication to battle the rising tide of omicron infections.

The Food and Drug Administration authorization of Merck's molnupiravir comes one day after the agency cleared a competing drug from Pfizer.

95. Study: Omicron less likely to put you in the hospital -

Two new British studies provide some early hints that the omicron variant of the coronavirus may be milder than the delta version.

Scientists stress that even if the findings of these early studies hold up, any reductions in severity need to be weighed against the fact omicron spreads much faster than delta and is more able to evade vaccines. Sheer numbers of infections could still overwhelm hospitals.

96. To grandmother's house or no? Omicron disrupts holiday plans -

Dave Fravel and his wife invited several relatives to their Cape Cod home for Christmas to share food, gifts and the togetherness they've longed for during the lonely days of the pandemic. They were also looking forward to a holiday sightseeing trip to New York City.

97. Pfizer pill becomes 1st US-authorized home COVID treatment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Wednesday authorized the first pill against COVID-19, a Pfizer drug that Americans will be able to take at home to head off the worst effects of the virus.

98. Monarch, GBT buy 8 acres in Midtown -

Monarch Alternative Capital LP, an investment firm with approximately $9.5 billion of assets under management, has purchased the 8-acre Beaman Toyota dealership property on Broadway.

In partnership with Nashville-based GBT Realty, Monarch plans to create a development in Midtown to address the city’s increasing real estate needs.

99. Omicron sweeps across nation, now 73% of new US COVID cases -

NEW YORK (AP) — Omicron has raced ahead of other variants and is now the dominant version of the coronavirus in the U.S., accounting for 73% of new infections last week, federal health officials said Monday.

100. Moderna: Initial booster data shows good results on omicron -

Moderna said Monday that a booster dose of its COVID-19 vaccine should offer protection against the rapidly spreading omicron variant.

Moderna said lab tests showed the half-dose booster shot increased by 37 times the level of so-called neutralizing antibodies able to fight omicron.