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VOL. 43 | NO. 24 | Friday, June 14, 2019

The Trust Company welcomes Davies

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Davies

Adam Davies has joined The Trust Company of Tennessee as a relationship manager.

Davies is a chartered financial analyst and retirement plans associate who earned a degree in finance from Wake Forest University in 2010. He most recently served as associate vice president, investment consultant and relationship manager for USI Consulting Group and before that, as a business analyst specializing in credit underwriting for BNY Mellon in Pittsburgh.

“Adam has a passion for helping individuals and companies reach their financial goals,” says Sharon J. Pryse, founder and CEO of The Trust Company of Tennessee. “His experience and personality make him a cultural fit for our firm, and I am excited to welcome Adam to our team.”

Based in Knoxville, The Trust Company of Tennessee is a state-chartered bank with more than $3.5 billion under management.

“I want to help clients develop, plan for and meet their financial goals,” Davies says. “Sometimes, people avoid financial planning because they don’t understand their options. My intention is to educate clients, provide some possible paths and help them along their journeys.”

Herbert College honors 2019 Farm Credit Scholars

The University of Tennessee’s Herbert College of Agriculture announces the 2019 Farm Credit Scholars.

The Farm Credit Scholars program was established at UT in 2012.

They scholars are: Jacob Eicher, Ian Kane, Sarah Cantrell, Kendall Martin, Shelby Mainord and Hence Duncan.

Farm Credit Mid-America’s No. 1 goal in this program is to enhance the learning experience of students and prepare them for careers as the future leadership within the agriculture industry.

These scholars will receive a $3,000 annual award as they continue throughout the program while upholding the principles and academic expectations set for all scholar recipients. The scholars are all pursuing majors within the Herbert College of Agriculture and in addition to their studies will be required to complete courses in accounting, farm and agribusiness management, agricultural finances, agricultural law, sales and leadership.

Tennova Pulmonology Newport hires Rao

Rao

Vijoydeep T.V. Rao, M.D., pulmonologist and critical care specialist, is starting a new medical practice at Tennova Pulmonology – Newport.

He is accepting new patients at his office at 434 Fourth Street, Suite 201, Newport.

Rao is dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lungs and respiratory tract. He specializes in caring for patients with lung cancer as well as chronic respiratory conditions, such as asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Rao performs advanced bronchoscopy and other procedures exclusively at Newport Medical Center.

Previously, Rao saw patients at a clinic in Morristown. He has served the community since 2012. He earned his medical degree from Madras Medical College in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. He completed an internal medicine residency at Central Texas Medical Foundation in Austin as well as fellowship training in pulmonary critical care at LSU Medical Center in Shreveport.

“I am committed to helping my patients with respiratory conditions to feel better and lead more active lives,” Rao says. “More than a million people in the United States have been diagnosed with COPD — including half a million men and women in Tennessee. There are many more people who have the disease without even knowing it.

“Asthma and emphysema, for example, are very prevalent in this community,” he adds. “The good news is that lifestyle changes and certain treatments can often relieve symptoms and slow the progression of the disease.”

Wanamaker, co-author receive Arrow Award

Wannamaker

Marianne Wanamaker, an associate professor of economics in the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, has been named a co-recipient of the International Health Economics Association’s Arrow Award for research showing the Tuskegee syphilis study decreased the overall life expectancy of black men.

“Tuskegee and the Health of Black Men,” published in Quarterly Journal of Economics in February 2018, was co-authored by Wanamaker and Marcella Alsan, an associate professor of medicine at Stanford University.

It examined the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male, which the United States Public Health Service began in 1932 to understand the natural course of the disease.

It was later ruled that researchers had misled hundreds of men over the study’s 40-year course. Participants were not offered penicillin when it became widely used as treatment.

Wanamaker and Alsan found the Tuskegee study reduced trust in the medical community among older black men. Their research showed that this group was less likely to get medical care and, in turn, their mortality rate was higher.

The life expectancy for 45-year-old black men decreased by 1.5 years compared to other demographics in the aftermath of the study, accounting for 35% of the life expectancy gap between black and white men in 1980.

“Our goal in this research was to shine a light on the populationwide effects of this egregious abuse of trust,” Wanamaker says. “Having the IHEA recognize this work with the Arrow Award helps us achieve that goal. It also is a great honor to be part of the illustrious group of previous award recipients.”

IHEA’s Arrow Award committee called Wanamaker and Alsan’s work “innovative and informative,” and named it the best paper in health economics in 2018.

The Arrow Award is named for the late Nobel Prize-winning economist and mathematician Kenneth J. Arrow. It has been awarded annually since 1993.

Knox County Schools make principal changes

Brace

Amy Brace will take over as principal of West View Elementary in July.

She joined Knox County Schools in 1992 as a teacher at Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Academy and has also served as a magnet program lead educator. She began her career in administration in 2008 when she was appointed assistant principal at Inskip Elementary and later as assistant principal at Sarah Moore Greene. In 2012, she was named principal of Lonsdale Elementary School, and in 2016, principal of Sarah Moore Greene.

Brace holds a degree in education, a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction and a doctorate in educational administration and supervision, all from the University of Tennessee.

Curry

Robin Curry will be the new principal of Sarah Moore Greene, beginning in July.

Curry joined Knox County Schools in 2001 as a teacher at Bearden Elementary.

She also worked as a parent educator before returning as a teacher at Cedar Bluff Middle School. She was selected to be part of the Leadership Academy in 2015 and placed at Vine Middle School as an assistant principal.

Curry holds a degree in psychology, a master’s degree in elementary education and an education specialist degree in educational leadership, all from UT.

Seth Smith will be the new principal at Fulton High School, effective in July.

He joined Knox County Schools in 1997 as a teacher at Farragut High.

Smith also taught at Fulton. He began his career in administration in 2006 when he was appointed assistant principal at Carter High School. He has been an assistant principal at Farragut and Central high schools, and in 2015, was named principal of Richard Yoakley School.

He holds a degree in education from UT and a master’s degree in administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

Jimm Allen is the new principal L&N STEM Academy, beginning in July.

Allen joined Knox County Schools in 2012 as a teacher at West High School.

He previously was a teacher in Florida. He was selected to be part of the Leadership Academy in 2014 and placed at Hardin Valley Academy as an assistant principal. He has served as assistant principal at L&N STEM and at South-Doyle High School.

Allen holds a degree in business administration from Bowling Green State University and a master’s in educational administration from UT.

Andrew Brown has been appointed principal of Central High School. He’ll start in July.

He joined Knox County Schools in 1999 as a teacher at Central. Brown went on to work for 12 years as a teacher and principal in Bristol, Tennessee.

In 2016, he returned to Knox County Schools when he was appointed principal of South-Doyle Middle.

Brown holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from Carson-Newman University, a master’s degree in educational administration and supervision from LMU and an education specialist degree in educational leadership also from Carson-Newman and is currently pursuing a doctorate in educational leadership at Carson-Newman.

Denise Cross is the new principal of Spring Hill Elementary School, effective in July.

Cross joined Knox County Schools in 2004 as a teacher at Beaumont Magnet Academy and previously worked as an elementary and middle school teacher in Oregon.

She has also taught at Vine Middle School and served as a TAP master teacher at East Knox, West View and West Haven elementary schools. She began her career in administration in 2015 as assistant principal at West Hills Elementary School and as assistant principal at Bonny Kate and Mount Olive elementary schools.

Cross holds a degree in elementary education from Western Oregon University and a master’s in instructional leadership from LMU.

Spencer Long has been appointed principal of Halls High School, effective in July. He joined Knox County Schools in 2011 as a teacher at Halls.

Previously, he was a teacher at Jefferson County High. He was selected to be part of the Leadership Academy in 2017 and placed at Karns High as an assistant principal and has been assistant principal at Bearden High.

Long holds a degree in biology and a master’s in educational leadership, both from Carson-Newman, as well as an educational specialist degree in educational administration from UT.

Anthony Norris has been appointed principal of South-Doyle Middle, effective in July.

Norris joined Knox County Schools in 2000 as a teacher at the former Karns Annex Alternative School.

He also worked for more than 12 years at South-Doyle High as a teacher and mentor teacher. He began his career in administration in 2014 as an assistant principal at Farragut High School.

He holds a degree in history and a master’s in curriculum and instruction, both from UT, as well as an educational specialist degree in administration from LMU.

Jamey Black Romig is the new principal at Halls Elementary, beginning in July.

Romig joined Knox County Schools in 1998 as a teacher at Belle Morris Elementary.

She also taught at Brickey-McCloud Elementary School, worked with Project GRAD Knoxville and served as an instructional coach at Dogwood and Halls elementary schools.

She began her career in administration in 2015 as assistant principal at Halls Elementary.

Romig holds a degree in psychology and a master’s in elementary education, both from UT, as well as an education specialist degree in administration and supervision from LMU.

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