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VOL. 42 | NO. 24 | Friday, June 15, 2018

ORAU taps Gamble as development vice president

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Wanda Gamble has been named vice president of business development for Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

She is the former vice president of business development for health and analytics at Battelle Memorial Institute.

Gamble will oversee strategic opportunities for gaining new business, formulate competitive strategies for growth and maintain/develop networks and partnerships for ORAU.

In addition, she will maintain and further develop strategic relationships with federal agencies, state and local government entities, government contractors and private industry.

“We are thrilled to have Wanda join our team in this leadership role,” says Andy Page, ORAU president and CEO. “Her extensive business development and customer relationship management experience, especially in the federal arena, will enhance our relationships with both our customers and our community partners. Plus, Wanda’s extensive experience and network of contacts will help her identify new business opportunities for ORAU.”

Gamble holds a degree in government from Auburn University and a master of science degree in telecommunications and business management from Golden Gate University.

Leadership Academy names 2018-19 fellows

The University of Tennessee Leadership Academy has announced its class of fellows for the 2018–19 academic year.

The Leadership Academy prepares educators from East Tennessee to become school principals. This year’s cohort includes educators from nine school districts – Anderson County, Blount County, Bristol City, Claiborne County, Jefferson County, Kingsport City, Lenoir City, Morgan County and Union County.

The full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program is a part of UT’s Center for Educational Leadership and is based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences.

The 2018-19 cohort of the Leadership Academy named 12 fellows:

-- Beth Beeler, Claiborne County Schools, has served as a fifth-grade teacher and speech language educator for several years. She teacher and literacy leader at H. Y. Livesay Middle School and has a degree in education and a master’s of education in instructional leadership, both from Lincoln Memorial University.

-- Jacob Bellissimo, Jefferson County Schools, serves as assistant principal at Jefferson Middle School and is completing his fellowship as part of the Governor’s Academy of School Leadership. He has a degree in history from Carson-Newman University and a master’s in education from the University of Tennessee.

-- Chad Deal, Anderson County Schools, serves as assistant principal at Clinton High School and previously taught social studies at both the high school and middle school level and served as the social studies department chair at Clinton High School. He has a degree in secondary education and a master’s in instructional leadership, both from Tennessee Technological University.

-- Melissa Graves, Union County Schools, is a kindergarten teacher and district curriculum coach. She has a degree in interdisciplinary studies from East Tennessee State University, and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Lincoln Memorial University.

-- Emily Helphinstine, Kingsport City Schools, is literacy coordinator for the district and previously worked as a literacy coach for the school system and a classroom teacher at John F. Kennedy Elementary School. She has a degree in elementary and early childhood education from Milligan College and a master’s of education in early childhood education from East Tennessee State University.

-- Suzanne Lewis, Kingsport City Schools, has taught kindergarten and first grade for several years at John Adams Elementary School and has been a lead teacher for mathematics for the school system. In 2018-19, she will serve in the role of associate principal. She has a degree in early childhood education from East Tennessee State University.

-- Renee Loan, Lenoir City Schools, is a personalized learning facilitator, helping teachers integrate technology and differentiation strategies into their instruction. She has a degree in English and women’s studies from East Tennessee State University and a master’s in education in educational media and technology, also from ETSU.

-- Destiny McRee, Bristol Tennessee City Schools, is a program assistant at Anderson Elementary School in Bristol Tennessee City Schools. She has a degree in early childhood education and a Master of Education in educational leadership and policy analysis, both from East Tennessee State University.

-- Misty Northrup, Morgan County Schools, is the library media specialist at Sunbright School and previously taught kindergarten and first grade there. She has a degree in early childhood education from Tennessee Technological University, and a master’s in curriculum and instruction, also from Tennessee Tech.

-- Judy Pearson, Blount County Schools, is an assistant principal at Heritage Middle School and has been a seventh-grade science teacher with more than 20 years teaching agricultural education. She has a degree in agricultural education from Tennessee Technological University, a master’s in agricultural education from Purdue University and an educational specialist degree in instructional leadership from Lincoln Memorial University.

-- Amy Pendleton, Claiborne County Schools, is assistant principal at Forge Ridge School and previously served as an English language arts teacher in several grades and a half-time administrator at Forge Ridge. She has a degree in elementary education from Lincoln Memorial University and a master’s in educational leadership from Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky.

-- Deidre Pendley, Bristol Tennessee City Schools, is a program assistant at Tennessee High School, where she also coordinates the LEAP grant program. She has a degree in secondary mathematics education from the University of Nebraska, a master’s in education from Tusculum College and an educational specialist degree in administration from Lincoln Memorial University.

Crossville Medical Center welcomes Good

Michael Good, M.D. has joined the Crossville Medical Group, part of the Covenant Health network.

Good

He is a gynecologic surgeon and will be part of the multi-specialty team of primary care, cardiology, surgery and OBGYN physicians.

He is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology, specializing in gynecologic and urinary surgery.

Good’s clinical interests are in minimally invasive gynecology, urinary incontinence and is certified as menopausal practitioner.

He attended medical school at East Carolina University and his residency was in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Tennessee Medical Center.

Castillo joins UT’s Fulbright scholars

A record year for the University of Tennessee’s Fulbright scholars has now been upped to 19 award winners.

Eighteen UT Fulbright U.S. Student Program recipients for the 2018-19 academic year had previously been named, a record for the school.

Castillo

The 19th UT student, announced last week, is Tiana Castillo.

In its history, UT has had 77 student Fulbright recipients, with its first in 1959.

This year, UT had 52 Fulbright candidates and 27 semifinalists, with 19 students offered awards –all single-year records for the university.

UT also has one alternate who could still receive an award.

Castillo, of Nolensville, is a senior majoring in communication studies with a minor in religious studies. She will travel to Vietnam for an English teaching assistantship.

3 East Tennessee teachers vie for award

The Tennessee Department of Education has announced the East Tennessee finalists for the 2018-19 Tennessee Teacher of the Year award.

“Teaching is some of the hardest, most rewarding work there is, and because of our educators and their commitment to an excellent education for all, more Tennessee students are prepared for their next steps in school and in life,” Education Commissioner Candice McQueen says.

The East Tennessee finalists are:

Lori Farley of North City Elementary in the Athens City School district, Bryan Schultz of L&N Academy in the Knox County Schools district and Amy Whaley of Morristown-Hamblen High in Hamblen County Schools.

These finalists will have the opportunity to serve on Commissioner McQueen’s Teacher Advisory Council for duration of the 2018-19 school year.

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