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Editorial Results (free)

1. Thanksgiving has good claim for top US holiday -

As the 400th anniversary of the first Thanksgiving approaches, I suggest that maybe the annual celebration should be recognized as America’s top holiday. Ahead even of Christmas, the perennial No. 1.

2. Spilling the secrets of the ‘Secret City’ -

Who knew the beginning of the Atomic Age was so funny? Sort of like the Humor in Uniform section of “Reader’s Digest,” Oak Ridge historian Ray Smith uses homespun humor to tell a condensed version of the key role his city played in the development of the atomic bombs that ended World War II.

3. Single-payer cuts the middle men but at what cost? -

Republicans made “Repeal and Replace” a catchy slogan for the right, but Democrats have one of their own.

Get ready to hear a lot of “Medicare for All,” the new rallying cry of those who think it’s time the United States adopts a single-payer health care system – or something like it.

4. Witness to birth of the Atomic Age -

Photographer Ed Westcott captured lightning, or more appropriately the birth of the Atomic Age, in a bottle.

Through the lens of his camera, what a compelling and fascinating story Westcott told.

5. Impatient Clemmons anxious for minority voice to be heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

6. Pound breaks ground with radio-based treason -

In 1967, Ezra Pound told Allen Ginsberg, “The worst mistake I made was that stupid suburban prejudice of anti-Semitism.”

Some say it was an apology.

Pound died in Venice in 1972, shortly after his 87th birthday. In one of his final cantos, he wrote, “I have tried to write Paradise … Let the Gods [and] those I love try to forgive what I have made.” The above was well after the treason case.

7. Short history of the nation's most-visited national park -

In 1899, the Appalachian National Park Association began discussing the concept for a 12,000-square-mile park in parts of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and Tennessee.

During the next century, many individuals, organizations, politicians and nature advocates worked to establish what is now the country’s most visited national park – the Great Smoky Mountains.

8. There’s more to money than a little pocket change -

A nice fat surprise came in the mail for you the other day.

It was a check that you were expecting, but the amount was still a boost for the day and the bank account. That doesn’t often happen, but it’s always good when it does, and in the new book “Coined” by Kabir Sehgal, you’ll see how that money affects more than just your checkbook.